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Gallbladder Cancer: Treatment Choices

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There are various treatment choices for gallbladder cancer. Which may work best for you? It depends on a number of factors. These include the location and stage of the cancer. Factors also include your age, overall health, and what side effects you’ll find acceptable.

Learning about your treatment options

You may have questions and concerns about your treatment options. You may also want to know how you’ll feel and function after treatment, and if you’ll have to change your normal activities.

Your healthcare provider is the best person to answer your questions. He or she can tell you what your treatment choices are, how successful they’re expected to be, and what the risks and side effects are. Your healthcare provider may advise a specific treatment. Or he or she may offer more than one, and ask you to decide which one you’d like to use. It can be hard to make this decision. It is important to take the time you need to make the best decision. You may also want to talk with another healthcare provider to get a second opinion about treatment options.

Types of treatment for gallbladder cancer

There are two main kinds of treatment for gallbladder cancer: 

  • Local treatments. These remove, destroy, or control cancer cells in one area of the body. Surgery and radiation are local treatments.

  • Systemic treatments. These destroy or control cancer cells throughout the whole body. Chemotherapy is a systemic treatment.

You may have just one treatment or a combination of treatments.

Goals of treatment for gallbladder cancer

Each treatment has a different goal. Your doctor will explain the benefits and possible side effects of each option. Discuss any concerns you have before making a decision. The treatments for gallbladder cancer include:

  • Surgery. The goal of surgery is often to take out all or as much of the tumor as possible. The gallbladder may need to be removed. This is called a simple cholecystectomy. Nearby tissues may also need to be removed. This is called an extended or radical cholecystectomy. That may include some of the liver, the bile duct, and lymph nodes. If the whole tumor can’t be removed, surgery may also be done to ease symptoms.

  • Radiation therapy. Radiation uses X-rays to kill cancer cells in a specific area. This treatment may be used after surgery to try to get rid of any cancer cells that are left. It can also be used to treat cancer that can’t be removed with surgery. Or it may be used to help relieve symptoms from advanced cancer. It’s often used along with chemotherapy in these cases.

  • Chemotherapy. The goal of this treatment is to reduce the chance that the cancer will spread to other parts of your body. It is also used to kill cancer cells that may have already spread beyond the gallbladder. Chemotherapy is usually given along with surgery or radiation. Lose doses of chemotherapy may given with radiation. This can make the radiation work directly on tumor cells. Chemotherapy may be given by itself if the cancer has spread from the gallbladder and can’t be fully removed with surgery.

Asking about clinical trials

New ways to treat gallbladder cancer are being tested in clinical trials. Before starting treatment, ask your healthcare provider if there are any clinical trials you should consider.                                                                                                                            

Online Medical Reviewer: Cunningham, Louise, RN
Online Medical Reviewer: Welch, Annette, MNS, OCN
Date Last Reviewed: 7/7/2015
© 2013 The StayWell Company, LLC. 780 Township Line Road, Yardley, PA 19067. All rights reserved. This information is not intended as a substitute for professional medical care. Always follow your healthcare provider's instructions.
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